“Illegal Alien”

A term with a harsh connotation. A term with single a classification: CRIMINAL.

And in all sense under many laws, illegal aliens are criminals but the crime has greater meaning than anyone would consider. Back in their homeland these criminals were facing poverty, rape, and/or famine. When they heard the US could offer something better they embarked on a path toward that better life. Leaving behind their family and even risking their own life to get here.

But once here in the US their classification became a greater crime. A crime that legal US citizens look down on. Simply because many consider illegal aliens to be: Drug dealers, pimps or rapists.

So when legislation brings in proposals to create a path for legal residency, the bills are never passed. In my due opinion, I feel that the issue has a lot to do with the term and what comes to mind when it is talked about. The term alone sounds awful, harsh and degrading, low and unwanted.

And you hear of these stories in the news and how anti-immigration bills make the US “safer,” But what sense, may I ask, because these illegal aliens are already here. And what what’s also not considered is that they are honors students trying to get an education, they are the farm workers who picked the fruit on your table, they are the cooks who made your food at the restaurant, and they are the maids who vacuumed your carpet clean.

So let’s get more personal here. This last, lame duck session when the DREAM Act failed to pass, did you consider the students, the maids, and the farm workers? I do hope so. Because those people aren’t here to ask for free welfare and they aren‘t here to take your job. These illegal aliens came here looking for a better life and an education.

An education that means more purpose than it’s use. Just in students alone an estimated “65,000 young people in the United States graduate from high school” as undocumented students (illegal aliens). In many cases these illegal aliens “watch their friends go off to college or work, and discover that it is [almost] impossible for them to do the same”

A mother voice tells you that she brought her children here for a better life and she “can’t imagine my [her] in Colombia. They think like Americans, and it wouldn’t be fair to them, with their desire for educations.” –

In grand regards I agree, it’s NOT fair. It’s unfair that such classification places all illegal aliens on the same boat, because not all of them are the same. And many of them are students, students who are trying to make the most who what is offered to them.

But what is much more sad is the fact that a “generation of undocumented children is coming of age, and lawmakers haven’t figured out such cases should be treated. Some states have considered whether to extend in-state college tuition benefits to illegal students; but such proposals haven’t gotten very far. On the federal level, a bipartisan group of senators and representatives sponsored bills like Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors, or DREAM, Act.” But still nothing…

And these students are waiting and fighting, they haven’t lost hope. Recently in California, the California Dream Act (add link to my post) passed the California’s state Assembly. These undocumented students are not taking the slots of Americans. They still have to pay their own way. And yet, some still refer to them as criminals.

Regardless, the state Senate is expected to pass the California Dream Act and there is a good chance Gov. Jerry Brown will sign it into law.”

And yet the term is only but the greatest struggle that keeps legislation from any reform.

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